American Farmer 2(4): 117-118 (Oct 1846)

THE BLACK TARTARIAN CHERRY

With this fruit perhaps many of our readers are acquainted; but, in visiting different parts of the country, I have been surprised to find that this, with many other fine varieties, is entirely unknown. Notwithstanding the exertions made by Horticultural Societies to encourage the growth of good fruit, and by nurserymen to introduce the trees, there is still a great dearth of these, and much may be done to awaken public attention to the subject, by publishing in our leading agricultural journals, correct representations and accurate descriptions of their qualities and general utility. I have accordingly procured the loan of a proof-sheet from Mr. Brown's work on Trees, treating of the variety or fruit in question, which I herewith present, hoping that it will elicit all the attention it deserves.

"BLACK TARTARIAN—known also by the names of Circassian Cherry, Superb Circassian, Black Russian Cherry, Fraser's Black Heart, and Ronalds' Black Heart. This variety is said to have originated in Spain, whence it was transmitted to Russia, and was carried from the last-named country to England, by the late Mr. John Fraser. In the account given of it, however, in the 'Pomona Londinensis,' it is stated to have been introduced into Britain from Circassia, by Mr. John Ronalds, of Brentford, in 1794. It is distinguished for its large, obtuse-heart-shaped, shining purplish-black fruit, with an uneven surface, containing a rich, juicy, tender, purplish flesh. It differs from many other varieties in hanging in clusters, which enables it to be easily gathered. It is a cherry of great excellence, bears plentifully as a standard, and when ripe, which usually occurs early in July, it readily commands in market, double the price of the ordinary kinds. This tree is valuable also, not only for its fruit alone, but from its vigorous growth, spreading branches, and symmetrical form, it is well adapted for the purposes of ornament, and is well worthy of general cultivation."

ROBERT B. PARSONS
Flushing, L. I., 3mo. 12, 1845.
American Agriculturist.

Black Tartarian Bibliography