Flora and Pomona (1829)
Charle MacIntosh

SUCCESSFUL METHOD OF INCREASING THE SWEET-SCENTED CHINA ROSE,
ITS VARIETIES, AND OTHER ROSES OF SIMILAR HABITS.

The usual mode of increasing these plants is by budding them on other roses of a more robust growth, and, for certain purposes, this is an excellent way. We have latterly succeeded in propagating them from cuttings, taken off just at the period when the flowers decay. The part chosen for this purpose is the young shoots that have produced flowers; these are taken off closely to the old wood, leaving the leaves entire. The cuttings so made are planted in rich light soil, under a hand-glass, in a cool shaded situation. They in general begin to grow soon after they are planted, and many of them are fit for taking up to pot before autumn. Such as do not root so readily, remain all winter under the hand-glasses, and may be taken up in April following, when they will be found well rooted, and if then potted and placed in a moderate hot-bed for five or six weeks, will come into flower and form handsome plants. This process answers completely when the object is to have neat flowering plants for pots, and we have reason to suppose that plants so originated will continue to live for several years, if even moderately attended to. When plants of greater size are required, whether to be trained against a wall, trellis, or for standards, the process of budding them on stocks of some of the wild roses is to be preferred.