The Gardeners' Chronicle 5: 782-783 (June 22, 1889)
DOUBLE WORKED MARÉCHAL NIEL ROSE
A. D.

"Rosa" seems to have grave doubts as to the merit of double working, as I advocated, for Maréchal Niel, which has long been practised in our great nurseries. Very interesting and valuable results have flowed from the working of some strong grower on to a stock first, and then working a weaker grower of the same kind on to that; indeed, it is doubtful whether we have made half so much of the practice as it deserves. No doubt it requires the keeping of stocks a year longer in the nurseries, as the first scion must have a full year's growth upon it ere that can be budded or grafted as the stock was before; but that objection by no means vitiates the practice, which is, without doubt, a good one. It may seem odd that the insertion of a germinator stem of some strong-growing variety should so materially influence both stock and graft or bud, but such is the case. In my own practice with Maréchal Niel, those which I have worked direct on to the briar, and on to the briar also through the intervention as primary stocks of Madame Berard and Lamartine, it should be understood that these strong growers had created the stock, practically long before they were budded with Maréchal Niel, and so far from these presenting a mere disc of wood in the stocks, they have stout branches of some 1, 2, or 3 feet in length, on to which the Maréchal is worked. Now, whilst in the case of the MaréchaI worked direct on to the briar, the stock has been but little swollen; the branch of the Maréchal, just above the junction, is treble the size, and very cracked or gouty. In the case of the double worked Maréchals, upon which the growth is always very robust, the original budded kinds swelled up the stocks thoroughly, and the whole growth, from stock to top, has grown simultaneously without cankering since the secondary budding of Maréchal Niel took place.