Gardenia (Hybrid Wichuraiana) [R. wichuraiana x Perle des Jardins]

May 6, 2002 (SJH)

May 6, 2002 (SJH)

SJH

W. A. Manda, 1899

Biltmore Roses, Biltmore Nursery, Biltmore N.C. 1913

Biltmore Roses, Biltmore Nursery, Biltmore N.C. 1913

The blossoms of the Gardenia Rose are similar at first to those of the Marechal Niel. They are pale yellow, but fade to creamy white as the flowers expand. The fragrance is most marked and abiding. The blooms come profusely and each flower is large and perfectly double. The plant is thrifty, luxuriant and absolutely hardy. By many the variety is called the "Hardy Marechal Niel." Does well in all latitudes, and is especially valuable in the North, where the Marechal Niel cannot be grown except under glass. While this variety has never attained the fame and popularity accorded the Marechal Niel Rose, it is in every way fascinating and desirable — a variety that should be much better known to Rose-lovers who appreciate a flower for its good qualities. (See illustrations, pages 58 and 100.)

References from 1989
  • Florists' Exchange, June 11. 602
  • Florists' Review, June 16. 56
  • American Florist, June 18. 1372
  • Florists' Exchange, June 18.
  • Public Ledger, Philadelphia, Pa., June 21.
  • Public Ledger, Philadelphia, Pa., June 22.
  • Florists' Review, June 23. 80
  • Florists' Exchange, June 23. 711
  • Florists' Exchange, June 25. 748
  • American Florist, June 25. 1400
  • American Gardening, June 25.
  • Florists' Review, June 25.
  • American Florist, July 2.
  • Gardening, July 15.
  • American Florist, July 16.
  • Rural New Yorker, July 23. 515
    A New Race of Roses. —The wave of emotional interest that swept over England at the appearance of the Lord Penzance hybrid sweet briers, crossed the ocean and touched even our prosaic shores. A similar, and even stronger wave of interest and wonder might rise here and sweep back to foreign shores if our rose lovers generally knew of the work lately done here, in producing a new race of roses by the use of the Wichuraiana cross. W. A. Manda has now growing on his place at South Orange, N. J., and has lately exhibited in New York and elsewhere, a new race of roses of his own making which, for general usefulness and actual beauty, must far outrank the briers which created such a sensation abroad. Roses that will grow 15 or 20 feet in a single season; that have glossy, finely notched, evergreen foliage; that are capable of throwing 18 canes from a single base on poor, sandy soil; that are from two to three inches in diameter of blossom; that are persistent and lavish in bloom; that have the most desirable forms; that are absolutely hardy—where have we found such heretofore? Yet all this we have in these new claimants, and at least one shows promise of having the perpetual habit.
        The real gem of the lot—though another bears the name of “Gem”—is called Jersey Beauty. Just such a flower as artists rave over, it shows a creamy disk composed of a single row of broadly obcordate petals, the blooms being held boldly in profuse quantity above the shining background of close-set leafage. The heavy brush of quivering, yellow stamens in the center adds the last touch of beauty.
        The three that complete the set are Evergreen Gem, Gardenia, and a double pink sort yet unnamed. This last has much the form of the “hundred-leaved” rose so long a favorite, but is a trifle more loose and graceful. The color, too, is nearly the same, but shades almost to white in an unexpected way at times. Evergreen Gem has a similarly formed bloom, but is creamy white with saffron tinted buds. Gardenia was first shown as Gardeniaflora, a descriptive but cumbrous name which has been shortened by the originator, as it surely would have been by the trade and the public who buy. It is very pretty when half blown, and the buds are almost a counterpart of those of the famous Perle des Jardins, which was one of the seed parents of both this and Jersey Beauty. Madame Hoste and Meteor aided in the production of the others.
        Experts have — perhaps wisely—held back from ardent praise of these new claimants. Last year, they thought a great deal, said little, and waited. This present season has, apparently, satisfied them, and they pronounce them “a good thing”, which expression, in the mouth of a grower, contains all the adjectives. The set will be offered for sale next Spring.
  • American Florist July 23. 1505-1507