François Foucard (Hybrid Wichuraiana) [Rosa luciae x l'Idéal]. Pale yellow, deliciously fragrant flowers on a vigorous climbing plant. Some rebloom.

August 2, 2009

August 2, 2009

April 22, 2004

April 22, 2004

May 6, 2002


The Garden 74: 167 (April 2, 1910)
WICHURAIANA ROSE FRANCOIS FOUCARD
S. A.

THE newer wichuraiana Roses are among the greatest boons which have come to the assistance of the gardener — amateur or professional — who desires to render his garden picturesque and attractive. Many of them are pictures of beauty even before they bloom, on account of their exquisite glossy foliage, while the greater number flower with the utmost freedom and adorn themselves with blooms which, though comparatively small, are of exquisite beauty. They are especially valuable for pillars and trellises, and their presence in many a garden has given it an aspect of the highest beauty. Their cultivation is easy in the extreme, and pruning is confined to cutting out some of the old branches, thinning out the weakly wood and only shortening the new shoots which spring from the base. A good supply of manure is advisable, and occasional waterings with weak liquid manure are beneficial. The shoots should be tied in loosely, and with these few details they will generally afford an annual source of delight to all.

The variety François Foucard, shown in the accompanying illustration, is one of the best in a fair-sized collection and one which is not too well known. It has foliage of the greatest beauty and multitudes of medium-sized flowers of a fine creamy or lemon yellow, deeper when first opening and passing off lighter. It is an excellent variety and can be confidently recommended. The plant shown is growing in a Scottish garden in the South-West, and just on the outskirts of a town of upwards of 20,000 inhabitants, where there are several factories emitting a fair amount of smoke. It is in a position which is much exposed to wind and is facing north-west, but receives a considerable amount of sun. This specimen has been planted about four years, and completely covers a pillar some 9 feet high.