Yellow China "debate" between Rivers and Loudon/Gordon, 1838-1842

Arboretum et Fruticetum Britannicum (Jan 1835 to July 1838
  Vol. 2 p. 771
R. indica.
R. i.
11 ochroleuca Bot. Reg., the yellow China Rose, has large cream-coloured flowers, deepening almost into yellow in the centre. It was introduced by Mr. Parks, in 1824, and has rapidly become a great favourite, in pots and ornamental flower-gardens.
Vol. 2. p. 782. [Excerpt from Rivers' 1836 catalogue]
Rosa indica odorata, or Tea-scented China Roses, 51 sorts. "These are China roses having a strong odour of tea: they are seminal varieties of the old blush tea-scented rose (R. indica odorata), and of R. ochroleuca, or the yellow China rose. "
Suppl. p. 2560.
R. i.
12 flavescens Hort. — This, Mr. Gordon assures us, is the true tea-scented yellow China rose, and not the preceding variety, which is generally confounded with it.
Rose Amateur's Guide p. 73 (1837)  
p. 73. Mr. Parkes [sic] introduced the yellow from China in 1824; and even now, though so many fine varieties have been raised, but few surpass it in the size and beauty of its flowers, semi double as they are; it has but a very slight tea-like scent, but its offspring have generally a delicious fragrance, which I impute to their hybridisation with Rosa odorata.
p. 76. The yellow Tea or yellow Chinese Rose, for they are one and the same, is placed here, as it has decidedly more of the habit and appearance of the Tea-scented Rose than of the Chinese: its smooth glossy leaves and faint odour of tea sufficiently show its affinity.
Lindley (1838): English winter of 1837/38. The white and yellow China Rose, the sweet-scented hybrid, Hamon, and Blairii, were entirely destroyed even in Hampshire; but the latter was injured on a south wall at Dropmore.
  Loudon: An Encyclopaedia of Trees and Shrubs p. 343 (1842)
Rosa indica
* R. i. 11 ochroleuca Bot. Reg. has large cream-coloured flowers, deepening almost into yellow in the centre. It was introduced by Mr. Parks in 1824, and appears to have been since lost.
* R. i. 12 flavescens.—This, Mr. Gordon assures us, is the true tea-scented yellow China Rose, and not the preceding variety, which is generally considered as such, and confounded with it.