Amaryllis vittata

L'Amaryllis d'Eté
Buc'hoz 1776

R Brown

Amaryllis vittata
Curtis's Bot. Mag. 1790

Amaryllis vittata
Sertum Anglicum t.15, 1788
(Redouté)

Amaryllis vittata
Redouté

Amaryllis vittata minor
Bury 1831

Amaryllis vittata superba
Bury 1831

Bury—Amaryllis vittata (minor): This bulb has been in the Fairfield Hot-house since 1803, and flowers once or twice every year, sometimes more luxuriantly than when the accompanying drawing was made; with a plentiful supply of water and fresh air during its rapid growth the stem will attain a greater height, and bear four and even six flowers. The flowers however seldom exceed in size those in the figure, and never nearly equal those of the Brazilian species; neither do they ever expand so widely; and the petals are narrower, and have the coloured stripes darker and more distinct. The edge of the outer petals are separate down to the base, but the centre ribs are firmly united more than half way up the tube, where they form a fringed nectary from which the filaments rise; these are white and lie in a compact bundle along the inner lower petal. The stigma is very deeply 3 cleft, quite white, and resembles the softest velvet.
    It is a hardy plant requiring very little artificial heat; it will even live in open ground in mild seasons, and has been generally considered a native of the Cape of Good Hope. (A Crinum?)

Bury—Amaryllis vittata (superba): This figure was from a bulb received from Brazil, by Mrs. Arnold Harrison and will be found on examination, to differ considerably from its less dashing sister, the original species from the Cape, now becoming a very scarce plant, as the more glowing beauties of the South American varieties, present greater attractions to the cultivator. The edges of the petals are united farther along the tube, in Superba, and the flowers open wider; the whole plant is much larger; and the colouring throughout, lighter, and gayer.