Vegetable System vol. 25
John Hill, 1774

Hill described twelve species of Amaryllis:

1. capensis
2. lutea
3. atamasco
4. formosissima
5. Reginae
6. biflora
7. sarniensis
8. undulata
 9. orientalis
10. guttata
11. Bella Donna
12. longifolia

Hill's plate of Amaryllis reginae is similar to that painted by Mrs. Bury, but was described as white streaked crimson. His Amaryllis biflora is presumably the plant described by Sloane, or a two-flowered variant. Hill's description of Amaryllis reginae is suspiciously similar to Amaryllis vittata which was illustrated by Buc'hoz in 1776, though shorter.

In the 12th volume of this work (1767) Hill described the newly introduced Amaryllis undulata [Nerine undulata], which he called Wavy Fairwort.


1. Atamosco, 2. Lutea, 3. Capensis 1. Formosissima, 2. Reginae 1. Biflora, 2. Sarniensis 1. Orientalis, 2. Guttata 1. Bella Donna, 2. Longifolia

 

1. ATAMOSCANE AMARYLLIS
Plate 1. Fig. 1.

Character of the Species. Amaryllis Atamosco

The Scabbard has only one Flower: its Petals are equal: and the Style and Filaments Droop. — Fig. 1. a b c.

This is a Perennial, native of the damp and shaded grounds in Virginia; a very elegant and beautiful Plant, or eight inches high. The Stalk with its Flower appears in August; the Leaves not till September. The Stalk is of a faint blueish green: the Leaves are of the same tinge, but somewhat darker: the Flower is of a delicate pale crimson.

2. YELLOW AMARYLLIS
Plate 1. Fig. 2.

Character of the Species. Amaryllis Lutea

There is only one Flower on the Stalk; its Petals are lanced and equal: the Style and Filaments are erect. — Fig. 2. a b c.

This is a Perennial, native of Spain and Italy; a very beautiful Plant of five inches high, flowering in August. The Stalk is of a fresh and fair green: the Leaves are of a fine pleasing green: the Flowers are of a beautiful yellow. The colour is much that of the Daffodils; and our Gardeners thence call it often the Autumnal Narcissus.

3. CAPE AMARYLLIS
Plate 1. Fig. 3.

Character of the Species. Amaryllis Capensis

The Stalk supports only one Flower: the Scabbard stands far below it: the Petals are equal, and expanded: the Style and Filaments are upright. — Fig. 3. a b c.

This is a Perennial, native of the Cape of Good Hope: it covers the bottoms of rising grounds, and grows from the cracks of moist rocks. It rises to eight inches high, and flowers in July. The Stalks are of a sea green: the Leaves are of a fine fresh green, and have the aspect of small Flaggs: the Flower is of a delicate blue, with an eye of yellow.

4. JACOBAEAN AMARYLLIS
Plate 2. Fig. 1.

Character of the Species. Amaryllis Formosissima

There is but one Flower on the Stalk; its Petals are unequal and irregularly disposed, three of them hanging down; with the Style and Filaments. — Fig. 1. a b.

This is a Perennial, native of South America; perhaps the most elegant and noble Plant of its kind, tho' all are beautiful: it grows to fourteen inches high, and flowers in August. The Stalk is of a light and pleasing brown, with very little green in it, except towards the top: the Leaves are of a fine deep and strong green: the Scabbard is of a deeper brown than the Stalk: the Flower is of the most glorious crimson, a deep yet bright colour; rich in the highest degree; and, when viewed in certain lights, appears spangled with gold dust.

5. MEXICAN AMARYLLIS
Plate 2. Fig. 2.

Character of the Species. Amaryllis Reginae

The stalk supports several Flowers; they are bell-shaped, equal, and waved a little at the edges; the Style and Filaments droop. — Fig. 2. a b.

This is a Perennial, native of Mexico, and of some of the West India Islands; a very noble and elegant Plant: it grows with a firm stem to a foot high, and flowers in August. The stalk is of a grey-green, stained with a deep and dusky brown: the Leaves, which appear afterwards, are of a good strong green: the Flowers numerous and most elegant; they are of a delicate white, with some little tinge of green, especially toward their base; and they are streaked, in a delicate manner, with a fine strong crimson. They resemble the Bella Donna extremely; but there is an absolute and fixed difference: the Petals in this are waved at the edge, and strait at the base; whereas the Petals of the Bella Donna have a bend at the base, and are strait at the edges.

This has been known by the name of the American Lilly, and Royal Lilly; and even writers of great merit have given it the term Lilium; as they have called others of this Genus Sisyrinchiums, Colchicums, and Narcissus's; nay Tulips. 'Tis to the accuracy of the excellent Linnaeus we owe the establishing such characters of this elegant race of Plants, as place them all together under one name; as they are truly one in nature. If the Classical characters of that Author were as well arranged as his specific, the world would have more obligations to him than to all other writers; and himself, would he now set about it, enriched with his present store of experience, would be indeed immortal!

6. TWO-FLOWERED AMARYLLIS
Plate 3. Fig. 1.

Character of the Species. Amaryllis Biflora

The stalk supports two Flowers; the Petals are lanced and hollowed: the Style and Filaments ascend. — Fig. 1. a b c d.

This is a Perennial, native of Antigua, and other parts of the West Indies; a very fine plant, conspicuous and striking in the highest degree; and which preserves its Flowers longer than most others of its kind. It grows a foot high, and flowers in July. The stalk is of a fresh and fine green, tho' there be in it a tinge of blueish: the Flowers are of a full deep scarlet; 'tis not a glowing or a gaudy, but a rich and most noble colour; toward the bases of the Petals, there is a tinge of yellow and of green; and the rudiment of the Fruit, on which they stand, is of the richest green; but grows brown after the Flower has fallen.

7. GUERNSEY AMARYLLIS
Plate 3. Fig. 2.

Character of the Species. Amaryllis Sarniensis

There grow many Flowers upon the Stalk; their Petals are curled, and turned back: the Filaments and Style are short. - Fig. 2. a b c.

This is a Perennial, and as appears, native of the Island of Guernsey, from which it has its name; but is most probably otherwise; and that it is a native of the East or West Indies; whence some roots have been brought, and by some chance or other left upon the shore. It is a very beautiful Plant: it grows to fifteeninches high; and flowers in August. The Stalk is of a bright green, tinged with brown: the Leaves when they rise, afterwards, have the same green colour: the Scabbard is of a very pale brown: the flowers exceed almost every thing in beauty: they are collected into a natural nosegay; their undulated form is in the highest degree elegant; and their colour a delicate pale crimson; which as viewed in certain lights, appears like the Jacobaean Amaryllis, spangled all over with gold dust.

8. UNDULATED AMARYLLIS

Character of the Species. Amaryllis Undulata

There are several Flowers on a Stalk: the Petals spread wide open, and are waved.

this is a Perennial, native of the West Indies; an elegant Plant: it grows a foot high; and flowers in August. The Stalk is pale: the Leaves are of a fresh and pleasing green: the Scabbard is pale brown: the Flowers are very elegant; they are of a delicate purplish crimson.

N.B. The Figure of this Plant, as it first appeared in Europe, in the King's Garden, is given Vol. XII. p. 63.

9. ORIENTAL AMARYLIS
Plate 4. Fig.1.

Character of the Species. Amaryllis Orientalis

The Stalk supports many Flowers; the their Petals are unequal and irregular: the Leaves are tongue-shaped, and smooth. — Fig. 1. a b c.

This is a Perennial, native of the East Indies and Japan; a very singular and noble Plant: it grows to two foot high; and flowers in an amazing glory and profusion in August. The Stalk is strong, thick ridged, and of an olive brown: the Leaves are of a deep blue grwwn on the upper side; a fine rich colour; they are whitish, with a pearly hue underneath; and their edges are tinged with crimson: the Scabbard is of a dusky brown, with a slight tinge of yellowish and of greenish: and the Flowers, which stand on long Footstalks, spread themselves out into a breadth, and with a pleasing wildness; which is not equalled by any other tuft: their colour is a delicate crimson:

*Exotic Botany.

The length of Footstalk to these Flowers gives us an easy view of some purple threads, which rise among their bases and are a part not much attended to by Authors; nor requisite, upon their plan of Distinctive Characters: but in the progress of a Natural Method, they are very important. Of these I have spoken elsewhere* at large.

10. EYE-LASHED AMARYLLIS
Plate 4. Fig. 2.

Character of the Species. Amaryllis Guttata

Many Flowers grow upon a Stalk: the Leaves are tongue-shaped, and eye-lashed

This is a Perennial, native of the Cape of Good Hope; a low but very elegant Plant: it scarce exceeds five inches inheighth; and flowers in August. The Stalk is of a fresh and pleasing green, tinged with a dusky brown: the Leaves are of a light and fresh grass green, and have an edge of a kind of weak spines all round them: the Scabbard is of the same dull brown, which stains the Stalk: the Flowers are numerous and elegant, finely disposed, and of a beautiful pale rose colour.

11. BELLA DONNA AMARYLLIS
Plate 5. Fig. 1.

Character of the Species. Amaryllis Bella Donna

There are several Flowers upon a Stalk; the petals are equal, and have a bend at the base: the whole Flower is bell-shaped: and the style and Filaments droop. — Fig. 1. a b c d.

This is a Perennial, native of our West India Islands, and of Surinam; and has long been and will be for ever a favorite in our best gardens: it is tall, erect, and very noble plant. The Stalk, which rises to more than two feet high, is firm, ribbed, and of a fine green, edg'd with an undulated Film of a light brown: the Leaves are of a fair grass green: the scabbard is pale and brownish: the Flowers, which are as big as Lillies, throw themselves every way with a noble freedom; a pattern for the fancy of a painter: their color is white, with a faint tinge of greenish in some places, which adds extremely to their beauty; and they are streaked along the backs of the Petals with a beautiful crimson.

12. LONG-LEAVED AMARYLLIS
Plate 5. Fig. 2.

Character of the Species. Amaryllis Longifolia

There grow many Flowers upon a Stalk: they are bell-shaped; and their Petals are equal: the Style and Filaments droop: the Stalk is flatted, and is not longer than the tuft of Flowers. — Fig. 2. a b c d.

This a Perennial, native of the Cape of Good Hope; a low, but extremely elegant Plant. The Stalk rises to more than four inches, and displays its glorious tuft of Flowers in July: the Stalk is flat edged, and of a dull and dead sea green: the Leaves are of the same dull and deep blueish green: the Scabbard is of a faint brown: the Flowers are large altho' the Plant be humble; they spread into an elegant tuft with great wildness and freedom; and ther colour is a strong fine crimson.


CybeRose notes:

Hill's descriptions of Amaryllis Belladonna and reginae are translated from Species Plantarum secunda (1762). Linnaeus's "ungue reflexis" (Belladonna) matches "bend at the base"; and "marginibus petalorum undulatis, nec ad ungues recurvatis" (reginae) is "waved at the edge, and strait [not bent] at the base."

Hill's Amaryllis biflora was distinguished by its ascending style and filaments. This may explain Mrs. Bury's comment on Equestris: "The degree of obliquity of the flowers and pedicles varies extremely, according to the state of expansion of the flowers, and their greater or less exposure to the influence of the sun; their angle can be no certain mark of distinction, though it has been considered one."